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Qualities to Look For When Buying a Power Drill

| March 04, 2021, 06:07 PM

People need tools for a host of different reasons. They could be anything from DIY projects to hobbies, or you need them for your job. Someone may spend hours in their home workshop or be a tradesperson. Whether it’s your first tool, a replacement, or an upgrade, it is always wise to do your homework beforehand.

One item that needs to be in every toolbox is the power drill. It can be utilized for many home improvement tasks, as well as for professional use. People can either buy corded drills or cordless versions that contain batteries. Let’s take a look at the qualities you need to look for in your next drill.

Suitability For The Task

Most jobs around the home won’t require a lot of power from your drill. A cordless version that’s between 4 and 8 volts would be considered as light duty. Many people go for something between 12 and 20 volts to ensure the drill would be up to any home task.

If someone is unsure what would be the most suitable choice, they can access lots of free information online. If someone was looking for a review of the Bauer 20v drill they would be able to learn the pros and cons of the product on a specialist website. They could also discover the power drill’s specifications, and watch video reviews. The site also provides helpful articles on such things as the best drill driver combos, or the best drill bits for stainless steel, etc.

If someone plans to spend all their time in a workshop, they may choose an electric power drill. It would be lighter, and therefore more comfortable to use. Because it could stay plugged in, it would never need recharging. In contrast, contractors who are constantly moving around may not want to risk tripping over the wires or damaging the cord. They may therefore opt for a cordless version with a more powerful battery.

Portability

If a tradesperson is working from house to house, they may opt for a cordless version they can carry around. Cordless power drills are especially helpful when people are working in awkward areas and restricted spaces. While they cost more than the corded versions, the investment could prove beneficial.

The downside of cordless drills is often the battery. A person may need to bring a spare battery with them at all times. The user may need to keep putting one on charge while installing another. These things can take up valuable time for busy workers.

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Power

Corded versions need a higher power to function. As we have said, they are lighter to hold but they can restrict a person’s mobility. People often have to use extension cords to help them move around.

A 450-watt drill would be fine for such things as plasterboard. Something around 550 watts should be suitable for home use. Some drills (e.g. hammer drills) go all the way up to 1500 watts. They are typically used for such heavy tasks as drilling masonry.

An Adequate Battery

Batteries in cordless drills offer a range of different choices. Needless to say, the heavier batteries last longer and cost more. Before someone gets to work on a task they will need to consider such things as the amps and watts of their drill, and the material they will be working with. They will also need to consider whether the tool will be used occasionally or continuously. Even the room temperature will have a bearing on how long the battery will last.

Cordless drills come with two choices of battery: nickel-cadmium or lithium-ion. Most drills use the latter, and they can be fully charged within an hour. They are ideal in being smaller, lighter, and able to hold their charge longer when not in use.

Additional Options

Contractors often need to buy extra tools like impact drivers. They are heavy-duty screwdrivers that can also drill into metal and tighten bolt heads and nuts. Hammer drills are designed to make small holes in plasterboard or wood. Other purpose-built tools to consider are air drills, drill presses, right-angle drills, and powered screwdrivers.

It is worth deciding whether you need ¼ inch, ⅜ inch, or ½ inch drills. Some models also feature built-in lights and levels or have adjustable side handles for stability. When the right choice has been made, you will have all you need for your next job. The tool will hopefully serve you for many years to come.

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Category: Local News, NEWS

About the Author - Stephanie Maris

Stefanie is a local blogger and social media content marketer from Maryland and most recently a wife and a mother. She has an unhealthy obsession with puns, sarcasm and caffeinated beverages.

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