Ellen Moyer Speaks Out On Fawcetts Property

| July 11, 2013
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editorialThe following letter to the editor was received by former Mayor, Ellen O. Moyer.

Let’s Make A Deal

A recent article in the Capital stated that the owners of Fawcetts laughed at an offer of 4 million Dollars to buy their property. Evidently they believed the value of the Fawcetts site to be worth more.

This raises the question of the value of the 2 parking lots that book-end the Fawcetts site owned by the City. Of similar size, is the value of the City property in excess of 4 million dollars too?

The Mayor is proposing to give the City property to a prospective developer in what he calls a land swap for 30 feet of boardwalk for pedestrians that leads to nowhere.

What a deal!

In 2011, a consultants report on harbor flooding( now forgotten) recommended

retro-fitting storm drains and installing an underground pump under the Donner parking lot for capturing and redirecting flood water.

An unintended consequence of the land swap sweetens the deal for the new private owner who could extract additional income from the public till for leasing the site for the proposed infrastructure improvements. Is this a fiscal train wreck in the making?

Let’s make a deal.

Let’s meet public expectations for a thorough, transparent, economic, fiscal comprehensive analysis of all things related to the arena of the City Dock described by the Mayor as a National Treasure and Crown Jewel before we give away land, change zoning, height and bulk ordinances to satisfy developer demands.

Ellen Moyer
Eastport
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Category: Letter To The Editor, OPINION

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  • Ann M. Fligsten

    I agree with the concerns of Mayor Moyer.The entire issue of the flood plain at the City Dock as raised by Mayor Moyer is something that we should focus on before redevelopment plans are implemented.

    The cost to preserve Annapolis and its historic district in a sound way will be extremely expensive and require approval and funding at federal and state levels. We do not need a band aid, but a real fix. There will be lots of competition for funding and I think Annapolis will make a good case that it should be at the top of the list!

    Without a complete solution to sea level rise for the historic district we are not facing the real challenge we face.